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Scenes From ARTCRANK San Francisco 2014



Some scenes form this year’s ARTCRANK event in San Francisco. 

Paper & Ink: San Francisco

Paper & Ink is a series highlighting ARTCRANK posters printed on Neenah Paper and the artists who created them. Our last installment from our 2013 show calendar features six designers from ARTCRANK San Francisco: Lil Tuffy Tuffington, Katrina McHugh, Joe Kimble, Nick Jacobs, Jessica Henry and John Baunach.

“C’est n’est pas une bike” — Lil Tuffy Tuffington

Lil Tuffy Tuffington

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster?

My piece was inspired by Margite’s “The Treachery of Images” but is most commonly known as “This is not a pipe.” I like appropriating and co-opting existing works, especially when working with bicycle-themed posters. A friend commented that the bike frame on this poster looks like the skeletons of stolen bikes that litter our neighborhood and are no longer bikes. They are just artifacts abandoned on parking meters and poles.

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

This was my second time working with this particular paper color, and I like how it creates a deep, natural base that I can use both light and dark colors on and allow the paper to be a neutral field. I use almost exclusively Neenah papers and I’ll probably be working with this one more!

“Foggy Ride to Ocean Beach” — Katrina McHugh

Katrina McHugh

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster?

I live by the panhandle in San Francisco and feel very fortunate that I can ride all of the way to the beach without more than a few short blocks on city roads. It’s a beautiful ride through Golden Gate Park filled with flora and fauna of all kinds. Due to our Northern California coastal climate it’s also a ride that often heads straight into the misty fog. Over the decade I’ve lived in the city I’ve grown to love this little city ride, foggy days and all, and created this poster to celebrate it.

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

I have been working as a print designer for a long time and have always been a huge fan of Neenah Paper. The Oxford line is a big favorite due to the great muted palette and unique texture. When working with a print method like screen-printing (where each ink color can add considerable cost) using a colored paper is a fun way to work another color into the palette from the beginning. I chose the paper before I even created the illustration and then picked a custom warm grey ink that was just a bit lighter to mimic the soft tones of a foggy day.

“From Stem to Pedal” — Joe Kimble

Joe Kimble

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster?

I wanted to make a poster that didn’t seem like a bike ad but still felt relatable. The elements I put together in this piece are meant to hint at unseen connections within math and mechanics that connect us to our surroundings while riding. Thinking back to my first rides through the city, the pedaling cadence resembled the reels of an old movie projector. The film that elapsed before my eyes had omitted the typical landmarks of the city to reveal veiled structures and undergrowth that subtly contribute to the absorbing energy of San Francisco.

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

I chose to work with Starwhite CVR Flash Blue 84#. I had never worked with a pearlescent stock and was excited to take this chance to experiment. This paper had an interesting warm white hue overall that really harkened to a vintage narrative. My favorite aspect was its iridescent qualities. The blue flash gave it a supernatural glow that went great with the navy blue ink I used for the graphic. The surface was a bit slicker than I was used to, so it was a little tricky at first to get a feel for how the ink was sitting. I also added deckled edges, which seemed to be very forgiving and consistent where other paper in my experience could tear irregularly into the image area. Overall, I was very pleased with the results.

“Night Ride” — Nick Jacobs

Nick Jacobs

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster?

I wanted to create a poster that articulated the feeling I get when I see bikes pass by me at night. Almost a fleeting image, I wanted to capture the essence of a cyclist darting by while I stand still. It’s quite an incredible thing to watch, especially if you’re on Valencia or Mission Streets. People and cars move fairly slowly, so when a bike breaks though the slowness, it’s quite the sight.

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

I chose the Neenah Classic Crest in Patriot Blue because of the density of the color. I wanted something matte enough that a gold ink would really pop and shimmer. It was a wonderful paper to work with and I cannot wait to work with another Neenah paper again.

“Monkey Wrench” — Jessica Henry

Jessica Henry

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster?

For Monkey Wrench I wanted to juxtapose the bad-ass feel of a low rider bike with some impish monkey mechanics. With the color choices, I was going for a vintage illustration feel. For me, riding a bicycle is one way to experience freedom. Drawing bicycles is always fun, therefore my posters about bicycles tend be lighthearted and whimsical.

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

Neenah had just the light grey color I was looking to use for the monkeys’ fur. I thought it would be a nice compliment to the saturated coral, aqua and navy used in the rest of the poster. They had so many options to choose from, I definitely want to experiment with different textures and colors for future projects.

“The Bike Lane” — John Baunach

John Baunach

Could you elaborate a little more on the idea behind your poster in a few sentences?

I have always been a big fan of maps. Any type of map, really. I love how they feel like a pattern that you can identify with. I played with the idea of a single bike able to span the whole city and then used the green paint stroke to provide the sensation of movement while tying it with the green of the bike lanes throughout the city.

Other Works 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why did you choose the Neenah stock that you did? How was it to work with?

A friend turned me on to the paper. Neenah has amazing variety and quality.

 

About Neenah

For more than 100 years, Neenah Paper (NYSE: NP) has been an innovative leader in the creation and manufacturing of premium, specialty and sustainable papers used for premium writing, text, cover, digital and specialty needs. The Neenah signature portfolio includes market leading brands such as CLASSIC®ENVIRONMENT®, and ROYAL SUNDANCE® Papers. The company also produces envelopes in thousands of unique styles.


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