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iBike Newton+ Power Meter



It’s been years since I’ve revisited the iBike power meter system. In fact, it’s been so long that I can’t recall which version it was, or whether or not it was wireless at the time ? Probably not ? In any case, what’s important is how I was drawn to the fact that such a clean, simple little device could provide a cyclist with as much data about his or her workout, as any "boat anchor" of a power meter crank system could. Indeed, one of the things that concerned me the most about using an aftermarket power crank,  was the potential to disrupt the symmetry of the groupset itself.  Campagnolo, Shimano and SRAM spend endless amounts of time perfecting their "groupos", and I never liked the proposition of swapping out components at the risk of imparting the precise relationship that exists between "parts". I can recall numerous instances where a cyclist swapped-out cranksets, only to have "Q" factors, "chain-lines", "ramping" and more go awry. Enough said. 

While in general, I’m not one for powers meters of any kind (as I start to eclipse my mid 40’s, I don’t need any such device alerting me to the fact that I’ve slowed down 😉 ), the new iBike Newton+ checks off all of the boxes that any other device on the market has to offer in terms of workout data acquisition, but in a simple handlebar mount format – via ANT+ technology.

Instead of using strain gauges, the Newton+ acquires it’s data through the use of a digital accelerometer and dynamic pressure sensors to measure forward acceleration and the opposing air pressure, while a wireless sensor mounted to the chainstay measures bike speed. The system takes it’s measurements 16 times per second and gives you separate left/right leg data. – all within +/- 2% accuracy.  

To wit, "the Newton’s ‘Physics Engine’ converts air pressure, accelerometer and speed measurements into opposing wind, hill slope, acceleration, frictional forces."

"The total opposing force, multiplied by bike speed, equals cyclist power. Because it accurately measures opposing forces and speed, the iBike Newton accurately measures power."

In addition, the Newton+ features an array of interesting training options such as average and max power, TSS (training stress score), IF (intensity factor) and NP (normalized power) measurements, FTP (functional threshold power) test, customizable workouts. Also exclusive to the Newton+, is it’s ability to calculate wind speed and hill/grade percentages – unlike any other device. Oh, and you can also add GPS to your rides if you use the Newton+ in conjunction with a smartphone (iPhone or Android).

Lastly, iBike offers it’s own free Isaac software that guides the user through the setup and calibration process. And, ride data can be analyzed  on either a Mac or a PC.  Moreover,  "rides" can be uploaded and shared on Facebook, or sent to TrainingPeaks or Strava. But, perhaps, the best feature about the Newton+ is, that it can be easily swapped between bikes and it only weighs 82g. No "boat anchor" here.  

Overview

THE IBIKE NEWTON The iBike Newton is the world’s only power meter that includes everything you need to train–and win–with power. And at $499, it is the world’s most affordable. Only the iBike Newton has a microcomputer that delivers power measurement, power training programs and power testing in one super-light unit, with the easiest-to-read display around. We’re often asked, how does iBike Newton work?  Where are the strain gauges?  Simply, the iBike Newton uses advanced accelerometers and pressure sensors from the space program to measure your power. The iBike Newton is a power meter and more.  It is a world class cycling computer.  It is incredible software.  It is a personal trainer that tests your limits and then improves them. All in one unit.  All for one purpose. 

To help you get more results and more fun in your cycling.

http://www.ibikesports.com/index.php/product/ibike-newton/


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